Visiting the Cenotaph
The Cenotaph in the Guildhall Square is accessible at all times.
 

Cenotaph Plan
Plan of the Cenotaph
 
Memorial Inscription
THIS MEMORIAL WAS
ERECTED BY THE
PEOPLE OF PORTSMOUTH
IN PROUD AND LOVING
MEMORY OF THOSE
WHO IN THE GLORIOUS
MORNING OF THEIR DAYS
FOR ENGLANDS SAKE LOST
ALL BUT ENGLANDS PRAISE
MAY LIGHT PERPETUAL
SHINE UPON THEM
 
The Cenotaph
The Cenotaph
 

 
Memorial Plaque







The names recorded on the WW1 Memorial are available on separate pages as follows:-
 

Navy
Panel 1 - Abbinnett A. to Crawshaw H.
Panel 2 - Creasey F. to House W.
Panel 3 - Howard J. to Parsons B.
Panel 4 - Parsons E. to Waight F.
Panel 5 - Wake H. to Ziething A. + 3 Women
 

 

Army
Panel 6 - Abbingdon J. to Cooper F.
Panel 7 - Cooper F.E. to Harvey L.J.
Panel 8 - Harwood W. to Mitchell G.
Panel 9 - Mitchell H. to Shepherd H.
Panel 10 - Shepherd L. to Younghusband H.
 
 

NOTE: Photos of the panels are available via links at the bottom of each page.

South Gunner
Statue of Gunner
 
Plaque
Plaque below Gunner
 
Inscription (South Gunner Plaque)
THIS WAR MEMORIAL WAS UNVEILED BY
FIELD-MARSHAL HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS
THE DUKE OF CONNAUGHT K.G.
ON THE 19TH OCTOBER 1921

 
Inscription (North Gunner Plaque)
THIS MEMORIAL WAS ERECTED
BY PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION
IN HONOUR OF PORTSMOUTH'S SONS
WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR 1914 - 1918
COUNCILLOR JOHN TIMPSON K.S.T. J.P.
MAYOR 1918 - 1921

 
North Gunner

 
Plaque
Plaque below Gunner

Peace or Conflict Memorial
 
This white stone plaque on the pedestal to the North Gunner was paid for by Portsmouth City Council and unveiled on 6 November 2003 by Mrs Madeleine Dunn who heads the Portsmouth War Widows.
 

Peace or Conflict Memorial
TO HONOUR ALL THOSE WHO DIED
SERVING THEIR COUNTRY IN
TIMES OF PEACE OR CONFLICT
WE WILL REMEMBER

 

World War 2 Memorial


Memorial
WW2 Memorial
Inscription
IN MEMORY OF THE SERVICE MEN AND WOMEN
AND THE CITIZENS OF PORTSMOUTH
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN DEFENCE
OF THEIR COUNTRY DURING WORLD WAR II


 
For 60 years following the end of World War II the only memorial to the men and women who lost their lives was a low stone wall at the rear of the Cenotaph with the words 'IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES IN WORLD WAR II 1939 - 1945' inscribed upon it.
 
On 8th November 2005 a memorial to those who lost their lives in WW2 was unveiled by Princess Alexandra. That this memorial should exist at all is almost wholly down to the dogged determination of Jean Louth whose father Harry Short had died on the beaches of Dunkirk. It was Jean Louth with the help of organisations such as the Normandy Veterans Association and the Portsmouth South Branch of the Royal British Legion who lobbied for funds to raise this memorial. This though is only the first stage as they need to raise another £80,000 to add the names of the 3,380 people who fell in the war. Jean is still collecting funds for the final part of the memorial; donations should be sent to Jean at 194 Wakefords Way, West Leigh, PO9 5QD.
 
Further information is available at the Portsmouth City Council website.
 
Further Information
Preparations for the construction of the Cenotaph began almost as soon as the Great War ended, but it was not until 1920 that invitations to subscribe to the cost were made. A list of all who donated money and the amounts they gave is held at the Central Library in Guildhall Square.
 
At the same time, local people were asked to nominate the service persons whose names should appear on the memorial, the criteria being 'That the man was born in Portsmouth, (or) that he resided in Portsmouth when the war began, (or) that his home was in Portsmouth when the war began'. Great stress was laid on the concept that 'Not a single name should be omitted', however a perusal of the local parishioners memorials shows a considerable discrepancy on this matter.
 
For a general description of the way that civic memorials were conceived, funded and designed and the way in which the names to be included was decided see:-
www.hellfire-corner.demon.co.uk/memorials.htm
 
The sculptures of the Gunners are by Charles Sargeant Jagger (1885-1934), an artist who was a veteran of WW1 and a recipient of the Military Cross. He was wounded at Gallipoli, and again, near-fatally during the Western Front campaign of 1918.
 

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